Sandro Calvani

Web Agency Torino
 Thu, 17 Aug 2017                
HOME PAGE
Biodata
Professional Interests
Professional Awards
Family history
Articles Books Interviews
Speeches Quotes
News Archive Press Releases Notes
Photo Gallery
Contacts



 News Archive

All the News about Sandro Calvani and his activities from 1997
Fake Drugs Kill People All Over World
WASHINGTON: Health and crime agencies of the United Nations say that counterfeit drugs are killing people from China to Canada, and that they "promote the development of new strains of viruses, parasites and bacteria ...for example in the case of malaria or HIV." And in many countries their manufacture and distribution are not even illegal.

The United Nations Inter-regional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI) said this month that "the Asian and African regions seem to be the most affected by counterfeit medicines" and "more than 30 percent of medicines on sale could be counterfeits in parts of Asia and parts of Latin America while in the former Soviet republics counterfeit medicines could constitute more than 20 percent of market value."

The World Health Organization’s 22-month-old International Medical Products Anti-Counterfeiting Taskforce (IMPACT) also issued its annual report this month, saying that in many countries "counterfeiting medical products is not considered per se to be a serious crime" or "sanctions are sometimes much lighter than those applicable to counterfeiters of products that have no implications for health, such as T-shirts." Prosecutions need "the proven fact that counterfeits have actually resulted in injuries or death."

Diplomatic niceties meant that the main source of manufacturers, China and India, were not named.

This growing global industry of fake and pseudo-pharmaceuticals has already defeated some legitimate cures: The time-tested malaria treatment chloroquine now fails most of the time in Africa because wrong doses in counterfeits have helped the parasite to evolve.

Researchers and pharmacologists around the world are working on amazing new drugs, but their efforts are undermined by the murderous opportunists who fake legitimate products. In this environment, commercial sales and donated medicines are no longer reliable.

A recent study in the Journal of Tropical Medicine and International Health estimated that 86 percent of under-strength fakes analyzed in Kenya and Congo came from India and China. Unsurprisingly, this "may be because of the laxity of Indian and Chinese regulatory bodies in checking exported medicines," it said.

Some makers are deliberate counterfeiters, faking the packaging and relabeling aspirin or chalk as a drug. But other culprits are legitimate firms that are simply slack in their operations: With more effort, they might make a perfect copy. Sometimes the entire firm is operating to low standards and at other times rogue employees work after hours to increase production and sell the drugs to criminal networks. Either way, such producers cut corners and costs by skipping the rigors of quality control.

I saw two dozen different unsound anti-malarial drugs in the pharmacies of Lagos and Abuja, the most important cities in Nigeria. One typical pharmacist carried a range of old drugs, plus some of the newer artesunate and artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs). Only one of these had been tested by a reputable agency, so one can assume the rest were useless.

But it’s not just the manufacturers who bear the blame. Even some international aid gencies and donors approve drugs that have not been tested for safety or for bioequivalence (therapeutically the same as the original patented drug). The WHO had to withdraw 18 anti-retrovirals from its HIV treatment campaign in 2004 because it could not be sure the drugs were up to standard. Today the Global Fund may have to withdraw several anti-malarials from its list for the same reason.

When a Thai government factory badly copied an anti-retroviral, the resulting GPO-Vir failed to help patients but did help the virus evolve defenses ![a] but MIdecins Sans Frontihres still distributes it.

One of the heroes of the fight against counterfeits is Dora Akunyili, a 52-year-old pharmacology professor who heads Nigeria’s National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control. Akunyili has a personal reason for fighting counterfeiters: A friend of hers died from fake anti-diabetes drugs and since then she has collected volumes of shocking tales. "People have been dying in this country from the effect of fake drugs since the early 1970s," she says.

Transparency International once ranked Nigeria as the most corrupt nation, but, recently, in large part because of Akunyili, it has risen from the bottom of the heap. In 2002, the WHO reported that 70 percent of drugs in Nigeria were fake or substandard: by 2004 that figure had fallen to 48 percent still a horrifying number.

And it’s not just poor countries that suffer. This time last year, Canada’s first death from counterfeits was caused by drugs bought off the Internet from Eastern Europe; they contined aluminum and arsenic. In the United States, fake anemia, diabetes and cholesterol products have set off massive product recalls

in the last few years.

Until international bodies clean up their acts and stop blurring the boundaries between safe medicines and substandard copies, and until there are harsh local and international penalties for manufacturing and carrying

counterfeits, the pirates will continue to get away with murder.

I saw two dozen different unsound anti-malarial drugs in the pharmacies of Lagos and Abuja, the most important cities in Nigeria. One typical pharmacist carried a range of old drugs, plus some of the newer artesunate ![a] and artemisinin ![a] combination therapies (ACTs). Only one of these had been tested

by a reputable agency, so one can assume the rest were useless.

But it’s not just the manufacturers who bear the blame. Even some international aid agencies and donors approve drugs that have not been tested for safety or for bioequivalence (therapeutically the same as the original

patented drug). The WHO had to withdraw 18 anti-retrovirals from its HIV treatment campaign in 2004 because it could not be sure the drugs were up to standard. Today the Global Fund may have to withdraw several anti-malarials from its list for the same reason.

When a Thai government factory badly copied an anti-retroviral, the resulting GPO-Vir failed to help patients but did help the virus evolve defenses ![a] but MIdecins Sans Frontihres still distributes it.

One of the heroes of the fight against counterfeits is Dora Akunyili, a 52-year-old pharmacology professor who heads Nigeria’s National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control. Akunyili has a personal reason for fighting counterfeiters: A friend of hers died from fake anti-diabetes drugs and since then she has collected volumes of shocking tales. "People have been dying in this country from the effect of fake drugs since the early 1970s," she says.

Transparency International once ranked Nigeria as the most corrupt nation, but, recently, in large part because of Akunyili, it has risen from the bottom of the heap. In 2002, the WHO reported that 70 percent of drugs in Nigeria were fake or substandard: by 2004 that figure had fallen to 48 percent ![a] still a horrifying number.

And it’s not just poor countries that suffer. This time last year, Canada’s first death from counterfeits was caused by drugs bought off the Internet from Eastern Europe; they contined aluminum and arsenic. In the United States, fake anemia, diabetes and cholesterol products have set off massive product recalls

in the last few years.

Until international bodies clean up their acts and stop blurring the boundaries between safe medicines and substandard copies, and until there are harsh local and international penalties for manufacturing and carrying counterfeits, the pirates will continue to get away with murder.

Roger Bate

The Korea Times, 22 Jan 2008
   

 
Contro i pregiudizi, nuove consulte giovanili
In progetto l’estensione dell’organismo nazionale per il pluralismo religioso e culturale nelle quattordici aree metropolitane dell’Italia

Roma – 11 gennaio 2008 - Quattordici nuove consulte giovanili distribuite nelle aree metropolitane si aggiungeranno a quella nazionale, costituendo una rete di esperienze e rafforzandosi vicendevolmente. Lo ha fatto sapere ieri Francesco Spano, il Coordinatore della Consulta giovanile per il pluralismo religioso e culturale, in occasione dell’incontro con i ministri dell’Interno Amato e delle Politiche giovanili Melandri, a un anno dalla costituzione dell’organismo. Il meeting è stato un’occasione per confermare l’importanza del progetto per favorire il dialogo tra le diverse confessioni presenti in Italia.

«Ci sono tendenze che stanno crescendo e che portano a distinguere i bambini per provenienza etnica e religione, – ha fatto notare Giuliano Amato – il solo fatto che nel mio Paese si possa distinguere etnicamente tra chi può ottenere una borsa di studio a differenza di un altro è un delitto di estrema gravità». Per combattere discriminazioni del genere, il ministro ha esortato i ragazzi della Consulta a interagire senza diffidenza, superando i pregiudizi e proseguire la loro attività sia sul piano delle relazioni internazionali, sia su quello delle comunità, per favorire le contaminazioni interculturali. “Se creiamo una coscienza condivisa – ha detto - questa può agire nella comunità”.

Giuliano Amato ha inoltre voluto scommettere su due cose. Sulla sua convinzione che le religioni possono essere un formidabile fattore di unione tra gli esseri umani e sul fatto che per tentare un’operazione del genere si passa per i giovani.

L’esperienza della Consulta, rappresentata da 16 ragazzi di undici diverse confessioni religiose, è stata commentata positivamente e incoraggiata per le sue azioni future. “Lo Stato ha il dovere di creare le sedi di confronto tra i cittadini che vogliono costruire il dialogo - ha detto il ministro Giovanna Meandri - e la Consulta si è dimostrata uno strumento che va portato nei fori internazionali”.

Sandro Calvani, direttore dell’UNICRI (Istituto di ricerca della Nazioni Unite che si occupa della prevenzione del crimine e della amministrazione della giustizia) ha portato alla Consulta e ai ministri presenti il saluto del Segretario generale Ban Ki-Moon. “Nell’organismo giovanile si fanno atti che costruiscono pace, esempio di buona pratica di grande interesse” - ha commentato Calvini, assicurando ai ragazzi la simpatia, l’appoggio e la collaborazione delle Nazioni Unite”.

Stranieri in Italia, 11 Jan 2008
Sequestrati 159 profumi contraffatti
FIAMME GIALLE Operazione ad Assisi
Denunciato il proprietario di una. profumeria

BASTIA UMBRA - Centocinquantanove profumi: è il numero di ’boccette’ sequestrate ieri mattina dalla guardia di finanza di Assisi a Bastia Umbra, in una profumeria, gestita da una persona di nazionalità italiana, segnalato alla competente autorità giudiziaria. Secondo gli uomini della finanza, l’uomo spacciava per veri profumi non originali: tra i marchi sequestrati, Dolce & Gabbana, Dior, Versace, Krizia, Fendi, Chanel, Calvin Klein, tutti prodotti ’taroccati’ , ma confezionati secondo i canoni delle più note griffe internazionali. Il sequestro rientra nell’ambito dell’operazione "Natale sicuro", con cui la Guardia di Finanza intensifica il proprio impegno per la prevenzione e il contrasto alla vendita di oggetti privi dei requisiti di sicurezza e affidabilità per tutelare i consumatori dai potenziali danni derivanti dall’utilizzo di questi prodotti.
Il rispetto degli standard di sicurezza, sottolinea la guardia di finanza, e la conformità alle normative europee vigenti rappresentano la migliore garanzia per tutelare i consumatori dai potenziali danni derivanti dall’utilizzo di questi prodotti. Sono ora in corso accertamenti tecnici per verificare la composizione dei prodotti sequestrati e la loro pericolosità per la sicurezza e la salute degli acquirenti, ma gli incauti compratori dovranno comunque fare attenzione: i profumi falsi, mette in guardia la Gdf, spesso causano bruciature o eczemi. Secondo il report Unicri (United Nation Interregional Crime and Justice research Institute) dedicato al fenomeno contraffazione, nell’Unione Europea i sequestri di merci contraffatte sono aumentati dell’88% nel periodo 200o-2006: i settori maggiormente colpiti sono i software informatici (in cui l’incidenza di prodotti contraffatti raggiunge il 35% di tutto il commercio), gli audiovisivi (25%), i giocattoli (12%), i profumi (io%) , i prodotti farmaceutici (6%) e gli orologi (5%).

Flavia Pagliochini

La Voce di Perugia, 22 Dec 2007
Dalla Cina con contraffazione
Allarmi sulla temibilità della Cina e della sua concorrenza spietata in questi ultimi anni ne sono stati lanciati a iosa. Tremonti, che in teoria dovrebbe essere il portabandiera in Italia del liberismo, a causa dei cinesi e della fifa che in lui infonde il loro dinamismo sui mercati, è arrivato persino a sostenere la necessità di misure protezionistiche ed impedire per tale via alle merci cinesi di invadere i nostri mercati.

Ma c’è un settore in particolare, nel quale il paese del dragone è forte ed è quello delle contraffazioni. Un mercato dalle dimensioni davvero preoccupanti. Solo in Europa ammonta a circa il 5%-7% del mercato legale e per dimensione supera quello degli stupefacenti.

L’Italia è uno dei paesi maggiormente colpiti dalla contraffazione. Le autorità doganali nel 2006 hanno sequestrato circa 18 milioni di articoli contraffatti. E proprio i cinesi rappresentano i veri campioni, sul mercato italiano per quanto riguarda la contraffazione. Controllano infatti circa il 93% di esso. Il Bel Paese, inoltre, rappresenta una importante porta di ingresso dei prodotti falsi che poi vengono spediti in altri paesi europei.

In Italia manca in effetti una seria normativa di contrasto al fenomeno, come spiega in un articolo del Sole 24Ore di sabato scorso Giovanni Kessler, alto commissario per la lotta alla contraffazione, anche se sono in discussione attualmente al Senato alcune proposte di modifica alla normativa vigente in materia di falsi. Sarebbe però opportuno, come spiegato nello stesso articolo, "adottare azioni sistematiche che vedano coinvolte le aziende, i consumatori, le autorità nazionali e transazionali". Occorre una risposta corale insomma, portata sia attraverso l’adozione di norme più adeguate che con un cambio di mentalità da parte delle principali categorie coinvolte, non ultime i consumatori ovviamente.

Ma forse sarebbe meglio e forse più opportuno dare al fenomeno una risposta più efficace. L’Italia infatti è il paese del bello, della moda dell’arte, insomma di prodotti che saranno pure belli esteriormente, ma dal basso valore intrinseco e facilmente riproducibili dai temibili concorrenti sleali. Insomma, accanto a risposte codice alla mano e al posto delle (troppo) inadeguate misure protezionistiche che tanto piacciono a Tremonti ma che non risolvono affatto il problema e anzi, lo aggravano procrastinandolo a data da definirsi, sarebbe forse opportuno rispondere agli invasori sleali con una maggiore attività in ricerca, innovazione e sviluppo che nel Bel Paese, da sempre troppo sensibile al bello, fa un po’ di difetto.

Ma curiosamente, accanto a questa notizia lo stesso Sole 24Ore di sabato scorso, alla pagina successiva riporta quella della Glaxo Smith Kline, multinazionale della farmaceutica che preferisce l’Italia alla Cina per la produzione di farmaci, dal brevetto scaduto destinati proprio al mercato cinese. Dalle dichiarazioni dei responsabili della casa farmaceutica infatti, la produzione di quel farmaco in Italia, oltre a garantire maggiore qualità assicurerebbe anche minori costi.

Blogosfere.it, 19 Dec 2007
Le crime organisé s’empare de la contrefaçon
La contrefaçon est devenue une activité majeure des mafias.
Selon les Nations Unies, le marché du faux a causé la perte de 100.000 emplois en Europe.

Le Monde, 15 Dec 2007
 Read More (3.5 MB)    
<< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 >>

| Home page | Biodata | Professional Interests | Professional Awards | Photo Gallery | Contacts |
WAIVER OF RESPONSIBILITIES
Every effort has been made to maximize the accuracy of the contents of this website. However no responsibility will be accepted for any inaccuracy. The opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent those of The United Nations or any of its subsidiary bodies.
Powered by Digibiz

AUTORIZZAZIONE UTILIZZO COOKIE
Ok Questo sito raccoglie dati statistici anonimi sulla navigazione, mediante cookie installati da terze parti autorizzate, rispettando la privacy dei tuoi dati personali e secondo le norme previste dalla legge. Continuando a navigare su questo sito, cliccando sui link al suo interno o semplicemente scrollando la pagina verso il basso, accetti il servizio e gli stessi cookies. Maggiori informazioni